Bilikiss Adebiyi-Abiola

Nigerian Bilikiss Adebiyi-Abiola returned home to Nigeria to co-found a waste recycling company, Wecyclers, and her vision is enormous. To transform the lives of people with garbage, create jobs, and help build the economy of her beloved motherland, Nigeria.

Bilikiss Adebiyi-Abiola
Bilikiss Adebiyi-Abiola

Wecyclers gives households a chance to capture value from their waste while providing a reliable supply of materials to the local recycling industry. Wecyclers works in partnership with the Lagos Waste Management Authority (LAWMA) and collects recyclable waste, including plastic bottles, plastic bags, and aluminum cans, at the household level using low-cost bicycle-powered collection vehicles called “wecycles”.

The wecycles are designed and manufactured locally and are operated by youth from local communities. The wecycle operators cover specific neighborhood collection routes to collect material from households. At collection, operators weigh each household’s materials. The weight of material that each household recycles is entered into the Wecyclers’ SMS points platform to automatically generate a personalized SMS. Wecyclers rewards households with redeemable points based on the volume and quality of recyclables that they give them. Wecyclers has registered over 5,000 households for our collection service, built 29 operational collection cargo bikes and collected over 300 metric tons of recyclable materials. Wecyclers has developed strategic partnerships with leading companies including the Nigerian Bottling Company, DHL and Coca-Cola.

Wecyclers is the recipient of multiple awards, including, the Cartier Women’s Initiative Award, Tech Award, Echoing Green Fellowship, MIT D-lab Scale-ups fellowship, MIT IDEAS Venture Grant, Yunus Challenge Prize at the MIT IDEAS Global Challenge Competition, Carroll Wilson Fellowship and is a Sustainia100 company. [Their] work has been highlighted in The Economist, CNN, Al Jazeera, The Punch, BBC, Marie Claire Magazine, New African Woman, The Independent among others. (Source: Huffington Post).

Advertisements

Kimberly Anyadike

Kimberly Anyadike

Nigerian-American Kimberly Anyadike was the first African-American teen to fly across the United States. Her flight went from Compton to Newport News and took 13 days to complete. She was accompanied by safety pilot Ronnell Norman and Major Levi Thornhill.

Kimberly Anyadike
Kimberly Anyadike

Kimberly washed airplanes and did other tasks to earn “museum dollars” that she traded in for flight lessons. Among the mentors available to kids in the program are several Tuskegee Airmen, who Kimberly has been immensely inspired by.

She plans to be a pilot and a cardiovascular surgeon.

Kelly Anyadike

Kelly Anyadike

In 2008, Nigerian-American Kelly Anyadike became a record-breaking aviator when she flew four different airplanes out of the Compton Airport and into the Southern California skies.

Kelly Anyadike
Kelly Anyadike

She went into the into the Guinness Book of world Records for being the youngest African-American female to solo in four different fixed-wing aircraft on the same day. She was 16.


In 2008, on her 16th birthday, Kelly made her way Kelly has been involved in Tomorrow’s Aeronautical Museum’s flight program since she was 15.

Anne-Marie Imafidon

Anne-Marie Imafidon

Nigerian-British Anne-Marie Imafidon is a computing, mathematics and language child prodigy. She speaks six languages and graduated from college at age 10. At 11, she was the youngest person to pass the U.K.’s A-level computing exam and Mathematics. She is is the eldest daughter in what has been dubbed, Britain’s smartest family.

Anne-Marie Imafidon
Anne-Marie Imafidon

She went on to attend John Hopkins University in Baltimore and then became the youngest ever to receive a Combined Masters Degree in Mathematics and Computer Science in June of 2010 from the prestigious Oxford University at the age of 20.

Imafidon is currently championing the STEM cause, and won the 2014 FDM Everywoman  Rising Star of the Year Award.